Everything you need to know about the new GMAT Enhanced Score Report (ESR) in 2018

Reading Time: 13 minutes

ESR – The acronym ESR stands for ‘Enhanced Score Report’. The ESR is a report which gives an in-depth analysis of a test taker’s performance on the GMAT. However, the ESR is not an alternative to the official score which a student receives on completion of the test. It can be used in conjunction with the official score report to obtain valuable insights into the performance of the aspirant.
 
The ESR is not generated automatically, like the official score report. A student has to subscribe for the ESR separately, by paying a prescribed fee, which is not included in the GMAT examination fee.
A student who wishes to subscribe to the ESR can do so by paying an additional fee of $30, over and above the $250 which he/she would have paid for taking up the GMAT.
 
In monetary terms, we feel that this is slightly unfair on the student who has already paid a substantial amount to take up the GMAT; we feel that the ESR should have been made a part of the official score report, so that the student could reap the benefits of the test fee that he/she has paid. However, since this is something which is neither under your control not ours, let us focus on the more important question which is –
 

Should you take the GMAT Enhanced Score Report (ESR)?

 
The answer is – YES.
 
Effective June 2018, GMAC has brought in some changes into the ESR report, which will let you extract more data than ever before, on your performance in the GMAT. Therefore, it is worth paying the additional $30 for the ESR, since it allows you to extract a lot of useful information about your performance in the GMAT, both at the macro and micro levels.
 
For someone who was not satisfied with his/her performance in the GMAT and wants to better it by taking the test again, the new ESR is just what the doctor ordered.
 
The ESR is now more informative than ever and interpreting it in detail will provide you answers to most of your questions on your performance, which otherwise would be mere surmises/predictions.
 
 

How to Interpret & analyze a GMAT Enhanced Score Report (ESR)

 
Let us look at the different parameters about which the ESR can provide you information:
 
1. Overall score and percentile
2. Time management – overall
3. Section wise scores
      a. Accuracy
      b. Time management
      c. Difficulty level
      d. Sub section scores
 

Overall Score and percentile:

 
This parameter measures your performance in terms of your final score and the relevant percentiles, which you obtained in the four sections viz., IR, QA, VA and AWA. Essentially, the difference between the ESR and the official score report is that, the official score report only provides your scores in the VA and the QA sections.
 

 
The overall score of 650, corresponds to the 73rd percentile, which means that this student has scored more than 73 percent of the students who have taken the GMAT, in the past 3 years. Similarly, the IR score of 6 corresponds to the 70th percentile, the Verbal score of 31 corresponds to the 61st percentile and the Quant score of 48 corresponds to the 67th percentile.
 
To give you a perspective, an overall score between 740 to 750 corresponds to the 99th percentile; a score of 51 in Verbal corresponds to the 99th percentile and a score of 51 in Quant corresponds to the 97th percentile.
 
 

Time Management – Overall:

 

 
This statistic talks about, the mean time per question, taken by the student to answer questions in the respective sections.
 
For example, the sample ESR under consideration tells us that the student took
      >an average of 2 minutes 43 seconds to answer a question in the IR section,
      >an average of 1 minute 48 seconds in the Verbal section
      >and an average of 1 minute 57 seconds in the Quant section.
 
This should not be mistaken to be the time taken by the student to answer every question, since the data talks about the AVERAGE time per question.
 
To offer a perspective, the average time per question in the different sections of the GMAT is as follows:
      >An average of 2 minutes 30 seconds per question in the IR section
      >An average of 1 minutes 48 seconds per question in the Verbal section
      >An average of 2 minutes per question in the Verbal section
 
On comparing the ESR and the ideal times, it may be observed very clearly that the time management could have been better in the IR and the quant sections.
 
 

Section Wise Performance:

 
Here, the student can view his performance in the individual sections and perform a granular analysis of his performance, which will in turn help him/her to improve on his/her weak areas (this is especially relevant for aspirants who want to re-take the test in a shorter timeframe.)
 
 

Integrated Reasoning:

 
Let us have a look at the scores from the IR section:
 

 
The IR section has a total of 12 questions which have to be answered in 30 minutes. Out of the 12 questions, some are experimental questions.
 
From the above statistic, we can do some quick calculations and arrive at the breakup of the experimental and the non-experimental questions.
 
The percentage 67 percent can be applied only on numbers which are multiples of 3, because, 67% represents (2/3). Therefore, out of 12 questions, either 3 or 6 or 9 can be experimental questions. Since the score of the student is 6 and he has not answered all of his questions correct, we can conclude that the total number of non-experimental questions are 9 in number. Therefore, there were 3 experimental questions out of 12, in the IR section.
 

 
From this statistic, the student has clearly spent almost half a minute more on all the questions which he/she has answered incorrectly. This has done two things:
 
      > It has increased the average time taken per question by almost quarter of a minute (~ 15 seconds)
      > Had the student managed this time to improve his/her accuracy, he/she would have almost the same time for the last few questions which would have had a positive impact on the accuracy.
 
 

Verbal Section:

 
The new ESR provides lot more information than ever before, about the performance of the student in the Verbal and Quant sections. This is the strongest reason why we recommend the investment on the ESR, especially for test takers who are bordering on the 700 range and want to improve their scores in their next attempt.
 
Let us have a look at a sample and put together, the pieces of the puzzle:
 

 
The student’s score of 31 corresponds to the 61st percentile which means that the student has fared better than 61 percent of the people who took up the GMAT in the last 3 years.
 

 
The GMAT is a computer adaptive test – this means that the computer continuously adapts to your level of competence and delivers questions which will test you appropriately. Hence, the difficulty level of a particular question depends on how many questions the student has answered right till that point, and not only on the previous question.
 
Therefore, answering the first few questions right, sets the tone for you to achieve a higher plateau for your scores. But, unfortunately, the contrary is also true. If you answer your first set of questions wrong, then you are pulling your score down.
 
In the above statistic, it is very clear that the student has a higher proportion of wrong answers in the first quarter and hence his overall score has never risen up to where it could have been, if it was the other way round.
 

 
Now, this is one statistic that is going to give you a lot of insights into the Verbal section. First, let us try to understand the total number of non-experimental questions:
 
In the first quarter, the student has answered 25% of the questions incorrect. 25% is represented by ¼. Hence, the total number of questions on which this percentage can be applied has to be a multiple of 4 i.e. 4 or 8 or 12 and so on.
 
[table]

[tr][td]Quarter 1[/td] [td] 9 [/td][/tr]

[tr][td]Quarter 2[/td] [td] 9 [/td][/tr]

[tr][td]Quarter 3[/td] [td] 9 [/td][/tr]

[tr][td]Quarter 4[/td] [td] 9 [/td][/tr]

[/table]
 
The Verbal section has 36 questions. As the graph itself says, each section in the graph represents approximately one quarter of the questions which means to say that each section represents 9 questions.
 
So, the number of non-experimental questions in this quarter is 8.
 
The percentage value of 43% is represented by 3/7. Hence, the number of non-experimental questions in the second section should have been 7. 29% represents 2/7, so the number of non-experimental questions should have been 7. In the fourth section, 50% represents ½; so the number on which the 50% can be applied should be an even number and naturally, it should be 8 non-experimental questions in the last section.
 
When we compare the current breakup of experimental and non-experimental questions in the GMAT, with the previous version, the comparison looks like the one shown below:
 

 
So, we can summarise that a total of 5 experimental questions have been taken off the test and also that there has been no change in the number of non-experimental questions.
 

 
A careful observation of the above statistic reveals the fact that the accuracy rate has been severely compromised in the last section, because the student has rushed through the questions, probably in an effort to complete in time or has just panicked.
 

 
The student has consistently maintained an average time of around 1 minute 45 seconds in all the other sections except CR, where he/she has taken almost 15 seconds more. This points towards a situation where the student was probably over-analysing the questions, especially given the nature of the topic.
 
 

What are the newest features of the new GMAT Enhanced Score Report?

 

 
This is a new feature which has been added to the ESR to let the student identify his rankings, if he/she were to be ranked solely based on the sub-sections. Comparing the performance of the student and the respective times taken by the student per question in the sub-sections, it is a fairly straight-forward conclusion that Critical Reasoning is a problem area for the student, where a drastic improvement is needed.
 

 
This is another new feature that has been introduced – measurement of performance in the three fundamental areas on which the GMAT tests a student – CR, RC and SC. Again, clearly, the student has not given his/her best performance in the CR section, with the best strike rate being 50%.
 
In addition, this statistic also tells us about how the student performed in the different sub sections under each fundamental skill, which is exactly what a student looks forward to, from a report of this calibre – agreed, this feature could have been introduced much earlier so that more students could have benefitted from it, but, as they say, ‘Better late than never’.
 
 

Quant Section:

 
In the quant section, the ESR provides data about the overall performance in the section and also based on fundamental skills like Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry etc., similar to the Verbal section.
 

 
The above score of 48 corresponds to the 67th percentile and hence this student has scored more than 67 percent of the students who have taken the test. It is pertinent to note, here, that the Quant section is quite demanding in terms of accuracy; this is to say that a decrease of even 1 point in the score brings your percentile down by several points.
 

 
Similar to the performance of this student in the Verbal section, the first and the second quarters show a trend where the student has answered more questions incorrect and hence this has had an impact on where his score settles down at. We can also observe that, in the third quarter, the student has made some amends by improving his accuracy, as can be seen in the following statistic.
 

 
We can do a similar analysis of the number of non-experimental questions in each quarter of the Quant section. By now, you will be familiar with the interpretation of the percentage values and using them to calculate the number of questions on which the said percentage is applied.
 
In all the four quarters, the percentages represent a fraction with a denominator of 7. Hence, the number of non-experimental questions in all the four quarters is 7. The total number of questions in the GMAT, as per the revised pattern, has reduced from 37 to 31. These 31 questions can be broken up into approximately four equal quarters in the following way:
 
[table]

[tr][td]Quarter 1[/td] [td] 8 [/td][/tr]

[tr][td]Quarter 2[/td] [td] 8 [/td][/tr]

[tr][td]Quarter 3[/td] [td] 8 [/td][/tr]

[tr][td]Quarter 4[/td] [td] 7 [/td][/tr]

[/table]
 
Hence, except the last quarter, we can see that there was one experimental question in each of the other quarters. So the reduction in the number of question in the entire section has happened by way of reduction in the number of experimental questions from 9 to 3.
 
A comparison of the breakup of the experimental and non-experimental questions in the present format and the superseded format is as shown below:
 

 

 
Analysing the time management chart in conjunction with the one on accuracy, although the student has improved his/her accuracy in the second quarter, it has come at a cost since he/she has taken almost 3/4th of a minute more than the allotted 2 minutes per question. This has had a cascading effect on the time management in the subsequent quarters, where the student has probably realised his/her folly and tried to compensate. But, in doing so, he/she probably overdid it and has rushed through the last quarter, which has resulted in reduced accuracy, as discussed earlier.
 

 
This is an additional statistic that the new ESR provides which gives information about the mean time taken to solve a question, based on the different fundamental skills. Looking at the sample data, the student has taken marginally more time per question in the Algebra and geometry questions, which if they were more in number, could have affected the time management in that segment of the test.
 

 
The above statistic corroborates the conclusion that we drew from the sub-section timing statistic – the student has fared relatively well in Arithmetic, compared to Algebra which is reflected in the increased average time per question in Algebra. We can draw a similar inference on the performance of the student in the Data Sufficiency section, although, in this case, the increased time per question has translated to a better accuracy rate.
 

 
This is probably the most important piece of information, for someone who wants to identify grey areas in his/her performance and improve on them. Geometry and Algebra are clearly the areas where this student has to make rapid improvements if he/she wants to improve his/her score in quant and therefore, his/her overall score.
 
 

ESR for canceled GMAT score:

 
If you have reached this point in the Blog, it can mean two things – you are someone who really wanted to know whether it is worthwhile or not to invest on the ESR, which is something that should be relatively clear by now; or you are someone who is wondering if this blog also has information on whether an ESR is available for a test which was canceled by the aspirant.
 
If a test taker cancels his/her GMAT score, he/she can still use the same ESR authentication code to access his/her ESR. However, this will not be possible if his/her scores were revoked due to a policy violation.
 
Note that, there have been cases where the ESR authentication code was received by the test taker after 2 or 3 days (sometimes even more) from the test date. In case this does not happen on its own, a mail can be sent to GMAC following which the activation of the ESR authentication code should happen.
 
We hope that this clarifies the slight confusion which may have prevailed on this particular topic.
 
 

CrackVerbal Tip on time management in the Verbal and the Quant sections:

 
The time allotted for the Verbal section is 65 minutes. We recommend the following strategy to maximize your right answers, whilst not compromising on the timing:
 
[table]

[tr][td] 45 minutes left [/td] [td] 10 questions completed [/td][/tr]

[tr][td] 27 minutes left [/td] [td] 20 questions completed [/td][/tr]

[tr][td] 9 minutes left [/td] [td] 30 questions completed [/td][/tr]

[tr][td] End of allotted time [/td] [td] 36 questions completed [/td][/tr]

[/table]
 
 
Coming to the strategy for the Quant section, we recommend that you follow the following:
 
[table]

[tr][td] 45 minutes left [/td] [td] 8 questions completed [/td][/tr]

[tr][td] 27 minutes left [/td] [td] 17 questions completed [/td][/tr]

[tr][td] 9 minutes left [/td] [td] 26 questions completed [/td][/tr]

[tr][td] End of allotted time [/td] [td] 31 questions completed [/td][/tr]

[/table]
 
 

The Way Ahead:

 
The revised ESR report, in keeping with the revised GMAT, has become more student-friendly and allows you more elbow space to fine-tune your strategies, especially if you are planning to take the GMAT again.
 
Although it costs you an additional $30, we feel that it is still worth the money you pay for it, since it pays you back in terms of providing you with all the information you require to better your efforts. Additionally, if you are thinking of getting your ESR analysed by a mentor, it provides the mentor with enough inputs to be able to guide you towards your goal of a great score on the GMAT.

 
 

  • February, 13th, 2019
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All you need to know about the shorter GMAT pattern starting April 16th 2018

Reading Time: 5 minutes

 

On 3rd, April 2018, GMAC announced some major changes to the GMAT test timing and to the number of questions you’re going to be having in both Quant and Verbal.

The new GMAT exam will be shorter by 30 minutes from April 16th, 2018.

 

Here is a quick overview of the changes:

 

  1. 1. The GMAT exam will now be 3.5 hours instead of 4 hours, including breaks and instructions.

 

  1. 2. The 4 sections (IR, AWA, Verbal & Quant) remain the same.

 

  1. 3. The section selection order continues to be there.  

 

  1. 4. The GMAT quant questions have been reduced from 37 to 31 and the time allocated to the Quant section been reduced from 75 minutes to 62 minutes. You get 2 minutes per question

 

  1. 5. The GMAT verbal questions have been reduced from 41 to 36 and the time allocated has been reduced from 75 minutes to 65 minutes. In terms of the timing, you still have the same 108 seconds per question.

 

Totally put together you have barely 127 minutes for both Quant and Verbal section compared to 150 minutes in the old GMAT.

 

 

GMAT pattern change April 2018

Why has GMAT made this change?

As you know that in the old GMAT out of 41 verbal questions, 11 questions were experimental. With the new GMAT pattern, the number of experimental questions in the verbal section has been reduced from 11 to 6.

 

Similarly, in the GMAT quant section, the number of experimental questions has been reduced from 9 to 3.

 

So the total number of questions that are counted towards the GMAT score remains the same, what really has reduced is the experimental questions.

 

 

We feel there could be a couple of reasons behind the reduction of experimental questions in the GMAT:

 

  1. 1. The reduced attention span of test takers.

GMAT is one of those tests where a lot of people find it very hard to keep the attention span. With falling attention span these days, even if a guy is very smart, at some point he is going to get a little fatigue – We think that was playing into aptitude!

 

Though you could be smart just because the test is so long, you are not really able to do your best.

 

So in today’s world, shrinking the number of minutes and the number of question available is something that is probably a demand in the test.

 

Especially if you compare it with something like the GRE

 

Where in the GRE you have the section for 30-35 minutes. In terms of the total time available, you’re actually going to do something very similar to GRE

 

  1.   2. Better calibration of GMAT algorithm

 

GMAT has been conducting the test for many years now

 

With so many re-takers and so many data points that they have probably, they don’t need 20 experimental questions!

 

They are able to do that today with far fewer questions

 

So the calibration of the Algorithm has also gotten smarter. and hence fewer experimental questions are required.

 

 

 

Should you reschedule your GMAT exam?

 

If you have already booked the test and are in the “zone” then no need to break the momentum.

 

Go ahead and take your test. The last thing you want is to reschedule and lose the momentum.

 

We personally don’t see a reason to reschedule because the questions have reduced proportionally and the average time per question still remains the same.

 

However, for any reason, if you feel that better mental energy management with a shorter format outweighs the slowdown in your tempo – then go ahead and reschedule.

 

If you have booked your GMAT exam on or before May 6th, 2018 and want to reschedule it then you can do so for free on or before April 11th, 2018.

 

 

 

Which Questions have reduced under the Quant & Verbal section?

 

Since the total number of questions would be reduced, the ratio of problem-solving and data sufficiency would probably still be equal

 

In case of verbal, we are assuming there is going to be a split of 12 questions in sentence correction, 12 in critical reasoning and 12 in reading comprehension

 

Instead of conventional 4 Reading comprehension passages, you’re probably going to get three reading comprehension passages. Which is one lesser RC passage to read!

 

 

What time strategy do we prescribe?

 

Well for Quant, instead if trying to manage the whole 62 minutes,

 

Try to break it into 4 parts:

 

So allocate 17 minutes for the first part and the subsequent 15 minutes each for the next 3 parts.

 

So basically you should be looking at solving 7 questions in the first 17 minutes and solve 8 questions each in the subsequent 15 minutes chunk.

 

Now for verbal, they way we suggest you split is 17 minutes for the first quarter, 16 minutes for the second, 16 minutes for the third and 16 minutes for the fourth

 

In the each of these quarters we recommend you solve at least nine questions each.

 

So 9 +9 + 9 + 9 = 36 questions & you are done with Verbal.

 

 

 

If you see the strategy is based on you spending slightly more time in the first quarter. Just because we feel that when you’re starting your test – there is going to be a little bit of inertia.

 

This strategy will give you that extra one or two minutes initially as opposed to the second, third and fourth quarter.

 

 

Should you change your test preparation strategy for the new GMAT format?

 

There isn’t any change in the GMAT question format or content.

 

The only change is that the section time and the number of questions have been reduced proportionally while the average time per question still remains the same.

 

So there wouldn’t really be a need to make any specific changes to your GMAT test preparation strategy as exam content, average time per question, and scoring methodology remains the same.

 

 

Is the change in GMAT format good or bad for test-takers?

This is great news because now you don’t need to spend 75 minutes in verbal and 75 minutes in Quant

 

There is a reduction

 

Anyone who has taken the full-length test will know that your actual concentration starts dropping somewhere after the first hour

 

So if the test itself is going to be of one hour.

 

Then you don’t really have to be worried about that part. So this is definitely good news for GMAT test takers.

 

If you have any questions then do let us know in the comment section.

 

  • April, 5th, 2018
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Decoding the GMAT Scoring Algorithm – A Cheatsheet

Reading Time: 12 minutes

Learn smart ways to exploit the GMAT Scoring Algorithm and optimize your preparation!

A lot of our students have been asking us:

“How does the GMAT algorithm work? What do people mean when they say Q49 V36?”

“With the same scores in each section, why are the overall scores for my friend and I, different?”

“If the scores are ranked out of 51, how does that account for a total score of 800?”

Don’t get confused. We will make it really simple for you in this article.

We will give you an inside peek into the working of the GMAT scoring algorithm.

And to help you get a holistic perspective, we will also explain the basic functioning of a Computer Adaptive Test (CAT) – the underlying logic behind how the GMAT works.

“How will understanding the GMAT algorithm help you?”, you ask?

It will definitely not magically improve your scores, but if you know how the algorithm functions, there are ways you can leverage the system to your advantage – we will talk about this later on.

We will be dividing the article into 6 sections:

A. What is the GMAT Test Structure

B. How does the GMAT Adaptive Scoring work?

C. How does the GMAT Scoring and Percentile system work?

D. How is the total GMAT score calculated?

E. Commonly Asked Questions about the GMAT Adaptive Scoring System

Let’s begin

A. GMAT Test Structure

The GMAT test is divided into 4 sections.

New Gmat test structure 2018

 

Read this article to get a breakdown of the GMAT Syllabus. And you will be glad to know that while taking the GMAT test, you can choose the order of the sections you want to begin with.
NOTE: We have updated this blog based on the announcement by GMAC on some major changes in the GMAT test timing and the number of questions you’re going to be having in both Quant and Verbal.The new GMAT exam will be shorter by 30 minutes from April 16th, 2018.

 

Cick here to know all about the shorter GMAT pattern starting April 16th 2018

 

Now, only two sections out of the four count towards your total GMAT score – both IR and AWA don’t count (doesn’t mean you don’t prepare for it – just that it is not needed for the 3-digit score out of 800).

Which leaves us with the Quant and the Verbal sections of the GMAT – they makeup for your final GMAT score out of 800.

The following are the total computed scores for the Quant and Verbal sections:

-> Quant (31 questions) – raw score out of 51.
-> Verbal (36 questions) – raw score out of 51

These questions are designed by trained psychometricians (yes – such a profession exists) who love making things terribly complicated. What else could explain the rationale behind picking random numbers like 31, 36 and 51? 🙂

We can’t change the way the GMAT Algorithm works, but we sure can help you get an understanding of how the system functions.

Don’t get overwhelmed by the numbers you will be seeing further down in the article. We are going to peel the whole onion – layer by layer.

B. GMAT Adaptive Testing

 

How is the GMAT Adaptive Algorithm different from the usual tests?

The GMAT algorithm is terribly precise and does not rely on the usual linear score that we are used to.

In the linear scale, the score is computed at the END of the test by taking the number of right responses and the number of incorrect responses. So in a school exam if you answer 6 out of 10 questions correctly – you get 60%.

In the adaptive scale, the score is getting computed after EVERY question on the test. The algorithm is constantly checking where to “keep” you. Get a question correct, the algorithm will “reward” you by giving you a higher score. Get a question wrong, the same algorithm will “penalize” by dropping your score.

So the GMAT is constantly trying to test your Quant and Verbal ability, that too within a short span of time and with a limited number of questions.

To accurately assess a person’s ability from 200 to 800 – means you have 61 possible scores on the GMAT. All of this from just 58 questions (why 58 and not 78 you ask? We’ll tell you why later on in the article).

The GMAT does this incredible thing because of the adaptive nature of the test.

> Understanding the Adaptive Algorithm using an example

Let’s understand the GMAT algorithm.

First GMAT will ask you an average difficulty level question.

Why average? Because we need to begin someplace and starting at the middle is the most optimized strategy.

Based on the accuracy of your response, GMAT will either reward you by bumping you up to a higher level, keep you at the same level, or demote you to a lower level.

If you get the right answer, the next question we put forth may be of the same difficulty level, or it may increase.

If you get the answer wrong, we will ask you another question of the same level, or an easier one.

By asking such a series of questions, GMAT figures out the range or the band at which you are at. Then GMAT will ask further question to understand the specific score within that range.

In short, the GMAT exam adapts to your performance on every question.

It selects each question based on your answer to the previous one, and how you have been doing so far.

Let’s take an example.

If you look at the chart, we have 3 test-takers.

Let’s assume that all three of them have started with an average difficulty level question.

Let us look at their performance on the 1st question:

T1 answered right, and hence progressed from the score range of 500 to 600.

T2 answered wrong, and dropped from 500 to 400.

T3 also answered wrong and dropped from 500 to 400.

Moving on to the 2nd question.

T1 answered right, again – he jumped to the 700 score range.

T2 answered right, and made a small jump to the 450 range.

T3 however, answered wrong, again, and dropped further down to 300.

As you see on the graph, the trend lines are high or low depending upon the answer to the previous question.

Which also incidentally, is how the adaptive algorithm works.

So if you are on your 25th question on the GMAT, the algorithm has data about your performance on the previous 24 questions. This means the algorithm is intelligent enough to get a good sense of where you are currently and will calculate your difficulty level to provide questions accordingly.

> Analysis with the Verbal section

With the understanding of the adaptive scoring engine, it’s be easier to break the example down further – showing you what my actually happen on the actual GMAT.

We will divide the GMAT Verbal scores into 4 buckets for your benefit – though the actual GMAT will have a finer calibration.

We’re going to use two hypothetical candidates – Amit and Rupa.

The GMAT scoring rules are as follows:

1. If you get < 40% of the questions right, you get demoted to a lower bucket.
2. If you get 40% to 60% of the questions right, you remain in the same bucket.
3. If you > 60% of the questions right, you get promoted to the next bucket.

Now let us say they take the first set of 6 questions, Amit gets 3 of them correct, while Rupa gets 4 of them correct. So, Amit stays in the same level while Rupa moves up.

Throughout the test, Amit consistently performs in the 50% range while Rupa does 60% or better.

Have a look at this table:

Amit’s performance being mediocre through the test, did not progress with his scores and stayed within the 25-30 bucket.

Rupa’s on the other hand, showed progress at every stage until she crossed the 40 bracket.

Now if you look at the number of questions they answered correctly, you will see Amit’s got 18 questions right and Rupa got 22 questions right.

4 questions may not seem like a big deal, right?

Think again.

If you look at the last 12 questions, Amit and Rupa got 6 answers right.

But here’s how the GMAT algorithm expects you to maintain your accuracy.

Rupa had to maintain accuracy on a much higher level.

Amit on the other hand, had to maintain the accuracy on a much lower level.

Why do you think that is?

Weighted averages – where there is a “weight” attached to every question.

So not all questions are the same – GMAT recognizes the effort for maintaining accuracy at a higher level (say a GMAT 700+) is far greater than maintaining accuracy at a lower level (say at GMAT 500+).

Now let’s move on to explain the working of the GMAT Scoring and Percentile System.

C. GMAT Scoring and Percentile system

Let’s tackle this one by one.

Now that you know how both – the Quant and the Verbal scores translate to a total of 51, let’s find out the bare minimum number of mistakes you’re allowed to make to get a high score.

How many mistakes can you afford to make on the GMAT?

It’s really hard to not make mistakes on the GMAT. So let’s say – it’s safer to make mistakes in intervals rather than continuously.

So in the first 15 questions, instead of getting question number 4,5,6,7 wrong – you get questions 4,8,12,15 wrong.

Making mistakes in a continuous string reduces your accuracy drastically.
Here’s a secret – You can actually make a few mistakes (say 2 in Quant and 1 in Verbal) and score a perfect 800!

Notice that even a solid score like a 710 – with a split of Q49 V38 – means you would have made over 20 mistakes! All the more reason not to fear intelligent guessing on the GMAT.

Moving on to the percentile system.

What do percentiles mean?

The percentile rank of a score is the percentage of scores in its distribution that are equal to or lower than it.

A test score that is greater than 75% of the scores of people taking the test is said to be at the 75th percentile, where 75 is the percentile rank.

For example, in the GMAT, if you’re in the 90th percentile, you’ve scored more than 90% of the people taking the test with you.

Let’s now have a look at the percentile charts for Quant and Verbal.

Notice a few “weird” things over here:

If you get a 45 out of 51 in verbal or above, then you’ll still land in the 99th percentile. That same score of 45 out of 51 in Quantitative is considered 57th percentile. This is because a lot more students are scoring a 51 in Quant than in Verbal.

However on the flip side, with the Quant percentile starting at 96%, every mistake you make drastically drops your score. For the Verbal spread of percentiles it is not that vast; this means the scope for improvement in Verbal will not be that steep.

So that is all that you need to know about the scoring system while preparing for the GMAT.
Let us now deep dive into how GMAT takes your sectional raw scores and computes the final GMAT score.

D. How is the total GMAT score calculated?

Let us look at a few things:

The total GMAT scores range from 200 to 800.

The Verbal and the Quantitative scores range from 6 to 51.

Both the Verbal and the Quant combine to give you the total GMAT score.

Here is a chart that you can use to check your final GMAT score, if you know your raw scores in Quant and Verbal.

So for you to score a 700 you need to have a total raw score total of 86. There are a few ways you can score this:

Strong in Quant

Q50 V36 (percentile)

Strong in Verbal

Q44 V42 (percentile)

Equally strong in both Quant and Verbal
Q48 V38

When you start your GMAT prep, you might realize which one of the two areas you are better at.

And no, being an engineer doesn’t automatically endow you with superior quant skills 🙂

Here, is the GMAT final score Percentile Ranking Chart:

Note this: even if you don’t score in the 99th percentile on individual sections, you can score in the 99th percentile on the GMAT.

Let’s see how.

Say, you get an 86th percentile in Quant (Q 50), and a 96th percentile in V (V42) – you will still get a 99th percentile overall (760). This is because there are fewer people scoring such high percentiles in BOTH the sections.

These charts are updated every year and you can head over to the GMAC website to know more:
https://www.mba.com/india/the-gmat-exam/gmat-exam-scores/your-score-report/what-percentile-rankings-mean.aspx

We just helped you understand how the scoring chart works – hopefully now you don’t really need to break you head over it 🙂

E. Commonly Asked Questions about GMAT Scoring

a) Does GMAT take time into consideration while calculating the score?

Remember, we are not calculating the time you take to answer each question, it does not have an impact on your final score.

b) If I am seeing easier questions, does it mean I am not doing well?

No! Firstly, you don’t really know if it is an easier or harder question (GMAT can make very tough problems deceptively simple). Secondly, it could be an experimental question, which means it is not based on your performance.

c) Does GMAT take the position of the mistakes into consideration?

Yep!

If you get questions wrong one after the other, you are in greater risk than if you distribute your mistakes over a range.

For example, let’s say, from questions 21 to 30 there are 2 candidates X and Y and their frequency of mistakes is:

X marks the wrong answers for questions 22, 26 and 29, while Y marks the wrong ones for 23,24,25.

Then Y would be penalized heavier than X.

d) Does it mean that the first 10 questions important on the GMAT?

There are 2 fallacies here:

a. Spending more time will improve your accuracy. If you do spend more time in the first 10 questions, (and not improving your accuracy much), then you are actually robbing other questions of the time they rightfully deserve.

b. You control whether you get the question correct. Actually, if someone is smart enough to get first 10 right – isn’t he/she smart enough to get the rest of the questions also correct?

e) If I keep getting questions correct, will GMAT start giving me impossibly tough questions?

Not true!

Yes, the level of difficulty does increase, but at a more controlled level. Also remember, that the questions are not “easy” or “hard” by themselves but they are “easy” or “hard” for the test taker at a given level.

f) Can you skip questions on the test and come back to them later?

Skipping questions on ṭhe GMAT is not an option.

If that option were to exist, it would go against the concept of the adaptive testing method.

g) What if I do not have ṭhe time answer all 37 questions on quant and 41 questions in verbal?

If you run out of time towards the end of the test, your overall score reduces.

The GMAT marks all unanswered questions as wrong, thus reducing your overall score.

h) Are the questions within an RC, computer adaptive?

No, the questions within the RC is not computer adaptive. The difficulty level of the question is pre-determined based on your performance up until that point.

i) Do continuous errors adversely affect your score?

Yes. The GMAT being a computer adaptive test, a string of errors will reduce your overall score.

j) Is the first question all test takers get of the same difficulty level?

No. The first question for all test takers are not of the same difficulty level. Since the GMAT is an adaptive test, you can get a question of a random difficulty level.

k) Does your performance in the quant section affect the difficulty levels of the question in the verbal section?

No – it does not.

l) Why are the percentiles ranks different for verbal as compared to quant?

More people are scoring higher in Quant than a few years ago, and fewer people are scoring as high in Verbal now than a few years ago.

With more people taking the GMAT from India, China and Asian countries the average Quant scores are going up and Verbal scores are going down.

You can read more on that here : https://gmat.crackverbal.com/gmat-verbal-new-percentile/

m) Do the AWA and IR sections also contribute to the overall score?

No, the AWA and IR sections do not contribute towards your final GMAT score.

n) Why is the GMAT score on a scale of 200 – 800?

This is a question a lot of people have been asking. Unfortunately, no one has an answer other than GMAT.

o) How do I know how many questions are experimental and which questions are experimental?

Refer to the section above on experimental question, we’ve provided a table with an explanation. And as for knowing which questions are experimental, there is no way of knowing.

p) How do I know which difficulty level a question falls under on the GMAT?

Again, there is no way of knowing the difficulty level of a question.

We hope this article helped you understand the GMAT algorithm.

One important piece of advice before we wrap this article up, understanding the GMAT algorithm will certainly make you aware of your scoring pattern, and the existence of experimental questions – but then again – it won’t help you beat the GMAT.

You can also watch CrackVerbal’s Founder and GMAT Expert – Mr. Arun Jagannathan explain the algorithm in the video below:

If you need any help with your GMAT prep, you can sign up for our online demo session :

  • February, 19th, 2018
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6 Reasons Why GMAT is Better than CAT

Reading Time: 5 minutes

“Should I take the Common Admission Test (CAT) conducted by the IIMs, or should I take the GMAT?” This question is the perennial butter-scotch/ black forest dilemma that any Indian MBA aspirant faces today.

Other major dilemmas students face are, “Which exam will I stand a better chance at?” “Which exam will give me more ‘bang for the buck’?” “Which test will give me access to MBA programs that are commensurate to my experience level?” And finally, “Which exam will open gates to the best management programs in the world?”

Let’s analyze some important points on the eternal CAT vs GMAT debate, to help you decide:

 

Factor #1: The Number of Aspirants

 

Over the last five years, both the CAT and GMAT have shown a consistent rise in the number of applicants, except for the last year. The number of aspirants for both the exams actually declined last year. However, even after considering the decline, the number of test takers for CAT is almost three times as much as the number of test takers for GMAT. Here is a brief illustration:

 

What does this mean for you?

Less competition and less pressure, which directly means to “more opportunities” for you!!

 

Factor #2: The Ability to Improve Your Score

 

One of the major factors as far as the CAT is concerned, is that it is like a bullet from a gun. Once shot, it cannot be recalled. Secondly, you only have one shot at the CAT, in a given academic year. You have a bad headache or a fight with your girlfriend on the day of your CAT or suffer from Delhi Belly, CAT will just say “BhaagBhaag, DK Bose”.

 

However, as far as GMAT is concerned, there is a lifetime cap of Eight times that you can take the test. In an academic year, you are allowed to take the GMAT five times, with an interval of 16 days between attempts. These repeat attempts do come at a price, but that critical option to improve your score exists and is used favorably by many candidates.

 

Target CAT/GMAT Score Number of Attempts

 

 

What does this mean for you?

 

This means that if you have a bad day or something crops up at work, you can shift your GMAT date to take it when you are ready. In fact, you can reschedule your GMAT dates online up to a week before the test date.

 

Factor #3: Section Selection

 

Before starting the GMAT, you can now choose the order in which you want to take up the various sections. This definitely help you, the test taker, to devise a strategy based on your strengths and weaknesses. This is a recent change to the GMAT test structure, introduced in July 2017.

Such section selection is not possible in the CAT.

We have done a detailed analysis of what this means to an Indian GMAT test-taker in this blog:

 

GMAT Section Selection – Everything you need to know

 

Factor #4: The Validity of the Score

 

Your CAT scores are valid only for that year. If you take the CAT in 2017, you can use the score to apply for programmes starting in 2018 and not after that. However, some institutions do give you the leeway to use your previous CAT scores when applying, but such schools are very few and far between.
On the other hand, GMAT scores are valid for five years.

What does this mean for you?

 

This means that you take your GMAT now and manage to get an awesome score but if you do not apply for some reason, you can use the same score to apply to any program even when:

 

• 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games

• 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia

• 2019 Cricket World Cup – England and Wales

• 2020 Summer Olympics – Tokyo

• 2021 World Ski Championships

are over 🙂

 

Factor #5: The institutions covered by GMAT

CAT scores in their current form, can be used only for admissions in the IIM’s and other affiliate Indian B-Schools. Although the CAT has been conducted for many years, it is still a very Indian test for Indian MBA programs.

Taking the GMAT opens the gates to the best institutions,both abroad and in India. Harvard Business School, Wharton and Stanford amongst other schools in the USA, INSEAD in France and Singapore and London Business School are some of the prestigious institutions that consider GMAT scores for admissions to their management program.

Top Indian B-Schools such as the Indian School of Business (ISB) in Hyderabad, Great Lakes Institute of Management (GLIM) in Chennai and SP Jain in Mumbai have also started considering GMAT scores for entry to their programmes.

What does this mean for you?

 

Well, we are certainly asking you to “Think beyond the IIMs” :). Not in the ponytail way, but know that GMAT will open a lot more prestigious doors than CAT will.

 

Factor #6: The relative ease of admissions

Acing the CAT is just the first step in what is an arduous and highly competitive admission process. Group discussions, essays and personal interviews are next before you bag the coveted admit.

And worsening your already difficult task is the fact that each step has a high and arbitrary “cut off”. You will have met the daunting sectional cutoffs, 10th marks, 12th marks, Graduation marks …… phew! before you finally convert it to an admission.

Also, the competition is unbelievably high. For about 1000 seats in the top five IIMs, you are competing with 200,000 people with similar aspirations. And do not forget the ubiquitous reservations!

Simply put, only 0.5 percent of the total number of applicants makes it to the IIMs.

Most B-Schools abroad have a streamlined system for admissions, which is also very subjective. Once you take your GMAT, you would need to send your essays and recommendation letters, in which there is a lot of scope to explain “gaps” in education and experience.

Heck, the schools abroad don’t even look at your 10th or 12th standard marks! It is all about how you are as a person, and not just meeting some arbitrary “cutoffs” which in all probability you don’t even know.

The conversion ratio is almost 10 percent for B-Schools who consider GMAT.

Conclusion:

 

Encapsulating the five factors we discussed, here is a comparison of CAT and GMAT, in a tabular ready-reckoner:

All I will say is, YOU DECIDE!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Got any questions about the CAT vs GMAT dilemma? Leave your comment in the comments section below!

Head over to our E-book library for a more detailed analysis of CAT Vs GMAT!

  • October, 31st, 2017
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GMAT Section Select Order : Everything You Need To Know

Reading Time: 9 minutes

The big news is that on 15th June, 2017, GMAC announced the GMAT Select Section Order, wherein GMAT takers can choose the order of the sections that they attempt. This means that now a test taker can actually start the GMAT from the Verbal section!

 

If you have taken the GMAT or have been preparing for it, you know that this is a huge deal. Taking the GMAT is a lot about conserving your mental energy towards the end,  especially while doing reading comprehension passages.

 

On 15th June, 2017, GMAC announced that GMAT takers can choose the order of the sections that they attempt.

If you are confused about what the GMAT Select section order means to *your* GMAT scores OR if you are wondering whether you should retake the GMAT, you have come to the right place!

 

In this article, we are going to deconstruct the GMAT Select Section Order so you know exactly what to do.

 

Let’s get started:

 

 

 What is the GMAT Select Section Order?

 

 

 

GMAC has made an announcement  on its official website.

 

Starting 11th July, 2017, GMAT is going to give you three options:

 

Option 1: The same structure as before

 

1. Analytical Writing Assessment

2. Integrated Reasoning

3. Quantitative

4. Verbal

 

Option 2: Verbal section first

 

1. Verbal

2. Quantitative

3. Integrated Reasoning

4. Analytical Writing Assessment

 

Option 3: Quant section first

 

1. Quantitative

2. Verbal

3. Integrated Reasoning

4. Analytical Writing Assessment

 

You just need to walk in to the GMAT center, and start the test by picking the order you want.

There is no need for you to select the options beforehand. You just need to walk in to the GMAT center, and start the test by picking the order you want. If you have already scheduled the test, you do not need to do anything different now!  Just go and do the exam in the preferred section order!

 

Here are a few quick facts about the new change that will help you understand it better:

 

1) Students must make this choice in 2 minutes. Otherwise, the test begins using the current default structure.

 

2) Students will not be shown the “Profile Update” screen after they have taken the test. Rather, they are presented their unofficial scores immediately after the test. The Profile Updates can be done anytime before or after the test from mba.com

 

3) The official score reports do not display order of test taking to the colleges.

 

4) The GMATPrep and ExamPack update (official tests available on mba.com) isscheduled for 31st July and our existing licenses will be valid. The update will not contain content updates. It will just be a UI overhaul with the new selection style offered.

 

 

I have done a quick analysis about the GMAT Section Selection order in this video:

 

 

 

 Would the GMAT Select Section Order affect my GMAT scores?

 

 

A huge YES! And in a positive way.

 

Here’s what GMAC had to say about it, officially:

 

“Our pilot findings concluded that taking the exam in different section orders continues to maintain the quality and integrity of the GMAT scores.”

 – Ashok Sarathy, vice president, Product Management, GMAC.

 

The problem with their analysis (and we pointed it out to GMAC when the study was shared with us) is that they used a computer simulation to see the probability of a student answering a question correctly or incorrectly.

 

The problem with computer simulation is that it discounts how GMAT students really feel when they take the test. It doesn’t take into consideration the stress of the exam. It doesn’t take into account how tired a student actually feels by the end of it all.

 

A lot of GMAT is about conserving your mental energy,  especially when it comes to the Verbal section. The reason why many students end up running into time management issues is because they take way too much time as the processing power of our brain significantly reduces after the first few hours of the test. (There is a term for this, it is called “decision fatigue”).

 

Here  is what we had to say about the topic. 

Now, with Verbal as the first section, you can actually push your scores by a few raw scores at least. This means a huge difference to your overall score.

 

The reason why many students end up running into time management issues is because they take way too much time as the processing power of our brain significantly reduces after the first few hours of the test.

If you are scoring in the lower 30s in Verbal, with a constant Quant score (say 49) you will end up with the following splits:

 

Q49 V32 -> 640

 

Q49 V36 -> 700

 

Q49 V40 -> 730

 

 

Even during the earlier “trial” that was conducted by GMAC, we saw several of our students at CrackVerbal scoring higher (than their practice test scores) on the Verbal section because of the shift in the order (needless to say, they picked Verbal as the first section).

 

Hence, if you have not taken the GMAT yet, the GMAT Select Section order might mean that you could actually do a lot better than you would have before this change.

 

 Should I reschedule my GMAT dates given this new GMAT Select Section Order?

 

 

If you think you need more time to process this change, OR if you think you would do better with Verbal as the first section (or Quant for that matter), and think you need more practice with this change in order, you should reschedule the dates. At this point, rescheduling itself is rather easy!

 

Crackverbal’s  advice to you is to consider starting your exam with either Verbal or Quant. Which of the two sections you should start with depends on your confidence in the Quant section. 

GMAC has announced that you can simply call GMAC Customer Service to reschedule your exam. If your request is received within seven days of the announcement, both your reschedule fee and phone fee of USD 10 will be waived. Given that GMAC made the announcement  on June 15, you have until  June 22 to reschedule without incurring any expenditure.

 

Crackverbal’s  advice to you is to consider starting your exam with either Verbal or Quant. Which of the two sections you should start with depends on your confidence in the Quant section. If you think starting with Quant can give you an edge, pick Option 3. Otherwise, stick to Option 2.

 

 Should I retake the GMAT with the GMAT Select Section Order?

 

  

Here are three scenarios in which you should consider retaking the GMAT:

 

Case 1: You did not do as well as you could have done in Verbal

 

If you did not do well and you think the reason is because you could not focus well on the Verbal section, you should definitely consider retaking the GMAT.

 

As mentioned earlier, even a slight increase in your Verbal scores can make a huge difference to your overall GMAT scores. A USD 250 investment for such an improvement is well worth it.

 

Case 2: You did not do well in the test because of stress or fatigue

 

If you are not a great test taker because you get very stressed about the test, especially Verbal, or you lose all your mental energy during the Verbal section (especially reading comprehension), you should definitely retake the GMAT.

 

You just need to make sure that you re-strategize the way you approach the GMAT. If you get a higher GMAT score, you can “wipe the slate clean” by cancelling your previous scores.

 

Case 3: You did reasonably well but feel you can do better with the revision

 

If you think you can improve your GMAT scores by even 30-40 points because of the new GMAT Select Section order, retaking the test would  certainly be worth it,  especially if you belong to the demographically disadvantaged background, such as Indian – IT – Male.

 

This is especially true if you are a reapplicant, and feel you could improve your chances with a better GMAT score.

 

 

 Will the GMAT Select Section Order affect B-School applications in 2017-18?

 

  

Definitely!

 

For the current admissions season, i.e., class starting Fall 2018, expect the average GMAT scores for most top schools to increase significantly.

 

In the recent years, the average GMAT scores at top schools have been shooting through the roof. For example, Stanford has its latest average GMAT score  at a obscenely high 737! 

 

By making such changes, GMAT has made it a lot easier for Indians and the Chinese – India and China are the two other countries in the top three test taking countries, apart from the US. Asian countries have stellar GMAT Quant scores but suffer in the Verbal section.

 

For the current admissions season, i.e., class starting Fall 2018, expect the average GMAT scores for most top schools to increase significantly.

Here is how Indians and Chinese do on the GMAT Quant section (compared to Americans):

 

 

GMAT Quant India China Comparison

 

 

Here is how they compare against the Americans in the Verbal section:

 

 

GMAT Comparison Verbal

 

 

You can expect the graph to change considerably because Indians and Chinese will start performing better in the Verbal section.

 

It would come as no surprise if schools such as Stanford and Harvard breach the 740-mark (corresponding to the 97th percentile currently), as their average GMAT score.

 

Closer home, this would affect the overall GMAT scores at ISB and the IIMs. If their average GMAT cutoff was around 700, expect it to go up as well.

You can expect the graph to change considerably because Indians and Chinese will start performing better in the Verbal section. 

Of course if you have a great profile, you can sneak in with a slightly lower than average GMAT score for that school. However, if you do not want to take a risk, as an Indian applicant, you need to score at least 30-40 points above the average GMAT score for that school.

 

 Why is the GMAT introducing the Select Section Order?

 

 

This is actually consistent with a lot of changes that GMAT has been doing over the last year, especially after Sangeet Chowfla took over as the CEO of GMAC.

 

Over the last several years, GMAT has been trying to fight a battle with GRE over the MBA admissions turf. The GMAT was traditionally used for MBA programs and GRE was used for MS programs only. However, this changed in 2016 when ETS lost the GMAT contract. So ETS decided to approach B-Schools to use GRE as an eligibility criterion for MBA programs!

More here:

ETS loses GMAT contract

 

Attacking the GMAT Monopoly

 

Though GRE is still a long way away (9 out of 10 applicants to MBA programs use the GMAT over GRE), GMAC doesn’t want to take the risk. It wants to make the GMAT as convenient as possible. There should be absolutely NO reason for you NOT to take the GMAT.

 

Over the last several years, GMAT has been trying to fight a battle with GRE over the MBA admissions turf.

 

Another reason is GMAT stands to make a lot of money if students end up retaking the test, or just if more people take the GMAT because it has become “easier”. However, “easier”  is a relative term because if the test becomes easier for everyone, people will start scoring higher, making it a level playing field.)

 

Here are some of the other changes that have been introduced in the last few years:

 

March 2016: You can reinstate your GMAT score even if you cancelled it earlier.

 

March 2016: You can now cancel your GMAT scores online after you leave the test center.

 

July 2015: You can take the GMAT within 16 days of your previous attempt (as opposed to the earlier 31 days period.)

 

July 2015: You can choose not to report your cancelled scores to schools.

 

January 2015: You can get an in-depth analysis of your GMAT performance by accessing the GMAT Enhanced Score Report (ESR.)

 

July 2014: You can preview your unofficial scores before deciding whether to report, or cancel them.

 

 

If you are looking at a common thread among these changes, it is this: most of the “facilities” cost you money, or encourage you to use a “facility” that will cost you money.

 

We will keep updating this article when we get more information about the Select Section Order change . Meanwhile, we would love for you to share this article with other GMAT test takers who might benefit from the article.

 

Please feel free to comment below if you want to share your thoughts on the matter, or if you want to learn  more. We respond to all questions.

 

 

 

  • June, 17th, 2017
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The Executive Assessment – A GMAT for Experienced Professionals

Reading Time: 5 minutes

So you have around 10 years of experience but do not have enough time to prepare for the GMAT. Fret not!

GMAT has launched Executive Assessment for seasoned professionals like you in 2016. The Executive Assessment is a shorter version of the GMAT – a mini GMAT, if you like. The test duration is 90 minutes and it tests you on the same sections as the GMAT does. However, the test does not have an AWA section.

Let us take a look at how the exam is structured –

 
Executive Assessment GMAT Crackverbal Exam Pattern
 

Okay, cool. What else do you need to know?

  1. You do not have an essay/AWA section on the Executive Assessment.
  2. You do not have breaks between the sections. It is a 90-minute-long race from the beginning to the end.
  3. The Integrated Reasoning Section score counts towards your final score!
  4. The ordering of the sections is different – Integrated Reasoning, Verbal, and then Quantitative.
  5. You have to cough up more money to register for the exam than you would if you take the GMAT. The registration fee is $350 plus taxes.
  6. The test can be rescheduled for free and can be rescheduled any number of times.
  7. You cannot attempt the Executive Assessment more than twice.
  8. You can retake the exam within 24 hours.
  9. The test is not computer adaptive like the GMAT. Questions are released in groups based on how you perform on the previous group of questions.

Here is a table summarizing the differences between the GMAT and the Executive Assessment –
 
GMAT Executive Assessment Comparison CrackVerbal
 
GMAT Executive Assessment Comparison CrackVerbal
 

Okay… So, which colleges accept the Executive Assessment?

Not many. So far 7 schools have signed up. Among them are Chicago Booth, Columbia Business School, Darden, LBS, INSEAD, Hong Kong Business School and CEIBS.

You can read all about this here –

http://www.gmac.com/executive-assessment/take-ea/ea-accepting-schools.aspx

The program is currently in beta-testing phase and you can expect many more schools to sign on to this in the coming months. Note that CEIBS indicates a preference for Executive Assessment over other standardized tests.

Where is the test delivered?

You can check the testing locations in your city here –

http://www.pearsonvue.com/gmacassessments/sa/

If you are from Bangalore, the test can be scheduled either at Koramangala or at Dickenson Road Center.

Note that you need your Passport to take the test.

What about Rescheduling and Cancellations?

You can reschedule your test as many times as necessary up to 24 hours before the scheduled appointment. This can be done free of cost. However, reschedules are not allowed less than 24 hours before your scheduled assessment.

If you need to reschedule less than 24 hours before your scheduled assessment, you will forfeit your assessment fee and will need to schedule and pay for a new assessment.

You may cancel your assessment (without rescheduling) up to 24 hours prior to your scheduled appointment. You will be refunded USD $250 out of the $350 that you paid while registering for the test.

Cancellations are not allowed less than 24 hours before your scheduled assessment. If you need to cancel less than 24 hours before your scheduled assessment, you will forfeit your assessment fee.

Note that you cannot cancel your results.

What about the Sections on the test? How different are they from the GMAT?

Well, let us talk about each section –

Integrated Reasoning this section is very much the same as that on the GMAT. You need to answer 12 questions in 30 minutes. You may get any of these four question types – Multi Source Reasoning, Graphical Analysis, Table Analysis, and Two-part Analysis.

Integrated Reasoning is much more important on this exam than on the GMAT. This section score actually goes into your final score.

You are allowed to use the on-screen calculator in this section. You won’t be provided this facility on any other section.

Verbal Section You need to answer 14 questions in 30 minutes. Hence, timing is more generous on the EA than on the GMAT. You get to spend around 128 seconds, on average, per question, compared to 109 seconds on the GMAT.

Sentence Correction topics seem to encompass the same range as the questions from GMAT. You can probably ignore the Advanced topics section in our course.

Critical Reasoning are also consistent with official GMAT questions. You should focus more on standard type of questions such as Find the Assumption, Strengthen, Weaken, and Inference.

Reading Comprehension section differs somewhat from the GMAT. Some passages might come only with one question. (Typically, on the GMAT, you expect to see 3-4 questions per passage). Some passages (around 130 words) are noticeably shorter than the typical GMAT passage.

Quantitative Section – You need to answer 14 questions in 30 minutes. The time allocated per question here is pretty much the same as on the GMAT.

You will get pretty much the same type of questions – on Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency.

What else do I need to know about the sections?

The Executive Assessment comprises five modules –

    1. Integrated Reasoning – 12 questions
    2. Verbal Reasoning 1 – 7 questions
    3. Verbal Reasoning 2 – 7 questions
    4. Quantitative Reasoning 1 – 7 questions
    5. Quantitative Reasoning 2 – 7 questions.

At the end of each of the five modules you will be presented with a review screen that will provide an opportunity for you to review and change your responses or return to any questions you may have skipped.  Note that you can only review and change responses within a given module.  Once you have moved onto the next module, the question responses on the previous module can’t be changed.

What about Program Selections?

When you create an account to register for the exam, you will be asked to select the program(s) that should receive your assessment results. You may select as many programs as you’d like, and you may change the program selections prior to taking the assessment. Once you have taken the assessment, only new schools can be selected to receive your results. If you retake/register for a second assessment, you may change your school selections.

How should you study?

GMAT suggests that you can take the EA with minimal amount of preparation. Preparation for this test should take you around a month.

Focus more on the fundamentals and standard type of questions.
 
All the Best!
 
I hope this article helped you in understanding – how the Executive Assessment is different from the GMAT.
 
If you loved the blog, please let us know in the comments!
 
 

Pro Tip: Curious about how to start off your own journey towards an awe-inspiring GMAT score ? Try out our free GMAT Online Trial course.

  • March, 2nd, 2017
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5 Changes in the GMAT exam that you need to be aware of!

Reading Time: 4 minutes

GMAC has announced several changes in the GMAT Exam policies to enhance test taking experience. Don’t worry! We will summarize all the changes in the GMAT over the last year in this article to help you understand the changes and strategize better.


Change 1 – Policy on Retaking the test

Well, there’s some good news and there’s some bad news. Let us start with the good news. If you are not satisfied with your test scores, you can retake the test after a 16-day time period (versus the earlier 31-day retake period). This is particularly good if your college application deadlines are right around the corner.

Note that you can only take 5 GMAT exams within a twelve-month period.

Then, there’s the bad news. GMAC has introduced a lifetime limit of 8 GMAT exams per candidate. This number is still very high for almost all GMAT aspirants. Moreover, if you cannot get it right within 8 exams, you will probably never get it right.

TIP – Plan your exams well. You don’t want to be that person who has wasted many attempts because she was either sick or ill prepared or because she did not carry her passport.

Change 2 – Cancellation Policy

Mostly good news here.

  1. You can cancel your scores immediately (you are allowed to view your scores after the exam) at the test center if you are not satisfied with your performance. Cancelling your scores at the exam center is free.

Here is some more good news –

The “C” that represents a candidate’s cancelled scores will not be shown on any future GMAT score reports. This feature will be applied retroactively to all previously cancelled test scores, which will be removed from all future score reports that are sent to schools.

Your cancelled scores will not be sent to any colleges that you apply.

  1. If you cannot make a decision about cancelling your scores at the test center, you have the flexibility to cancel the score within 72-hours of the test.

 

But they say, all good things come at a cost. You have to shell out 25$ should you decide to cancel your test scores after you have left the test center.

 

Here is the bad thing – you only get 72 hours to decide whether you want your GMAT scores to be cancelled.

 

  1. You can reinstate your cancelled scores for a period up to 4 years and 11 months after the exam date.

After your GMAT score is reinstated, a score report will automatically be sent to the schools you selected on the day of your exam. Cancelled scores will not appear on any GMAT score report sent to schools

You will have to cough up 50$ for reinstating your cancelled scores.

 

Here is a table for your quick reference –

[table]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Cancellation at the test Center[/td]
[td]No charge[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Cancellation after 72 hours[/td]
[td]$25[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Cancellation after 72 hours[/td]
[td]Not possible[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Reinstate your cancelled score[/td]
[td]$50; No extra charge for resending your scores to colleges[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table]

 

Note that you will still see a “C” on your GMAT score card to ensure an accurate record of your GMAT test taking history. However, cancelled scores will not be displayed on the version of score reports sent to schools.

Also, note that if you have taken the GMAT prior to Jul 19, 2015, you are out of luck. GMAC cannot remove the “C” designation in school databases from score reports sent to schools prior to July 19, 2015.

TIP – Decide which schools you want to apply and what would be a considered a “safe score” to apply to those colleges before you appear for your test.

Change 3 – Authentication code is now the same as your Date of Birth

You can now access your official score report on the link provided to you by using your Date of Birth as authentication code.

Change 4 – Exam pack 2 with two additional tests has been released

So what are you waiting for? Book your slot at CrackVerbal’s Infantry Road Centre or Koramangala Centre to take one of the official GMATPrep tests.

We provide all our students with free access to all the six official GMAT tests.

TIP – If you are like me and love to solve challenging questions, you can customize your GMATPrep experience using this screen –

Open GMATPrep Software >> Click on Practice >> Click on More Options

GMAT Prep CrackVerbal Changes in GMAT exam

Change 5 – AWA re-scoring service

If you are not satisfied with the score you got on the AWA section, you can request for your essay to be reevaluated for 45 $.

Note that the request for rescoring must be made within six months of your exam date. Also, you rescored results are final and you cannot submit more than one request for reevaluation of your AWA section.

You should get your results typically within 20 days of submission.

Be Careful! – Rescoring may result in an increase or decrease in your original AWA score.

In the next blog, we will take a detailed look at an ESR report and the exciting changes GMAT has implemented.

Adios!!

I hope this article helped you in understanding – how to tackle the changes in the GMAT and shine through.

If you loved the blog, please let us know in the comments!

Pro Tip: Curious about how to start off your own journey towards an awe-inspiring GMAT score ? Try out our free GMAT Online Trial course.

 

  • March, 2nd, 2017
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3 Changes to the Enhanced Score Report that you should know about!

Reading Time: 4 minutes

GMAC has introduced a number of exciting changes to the Enhanced Score Report. You can glean much more information from the report than meets the eye.

Applying for your ESR is a must if you plan to retake the GMAT and want detailed insights into your performance and your “problem areas”.

Change 1 – Percentage Correct

This is the most exciting change that GMAC has introduced in the Enhanced Score Reports. This chart helps us glean the number of experimental questions and thus, the questions that actually count towards your score.

We can also glean the distribution of experimental questions in each quarter.

Let us analyze each section –

 

Integrated Reasoning

 

 

A sample report –

percentile ranking GMAT exams Crackverbal

Let us apply some quant principles here –

56% of questions answered correctly suggests that the denominator must be 9. (Note that 0.56 *9 = 5 – a whole number).

 

Hence, the IR section has 3 experimental questions and 9 questions that are actually counted towards your IR score.

 

 

Verbal Section

 

 

We know that the Verbal section has 41 questions. The Verbal Section is divided into four quarters.

 

We can safely assume the distribution of questions in each section as –

[table]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 1[/td]
[td]10[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 2[/td]
[td]10[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 3[/td]
[td]10[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 4[/td]
[td]11[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table]

 

Let us look at a sample report –

Enhanced Score Report Analysis GMAT Crackverbal
Quarter 1 – 25% incorrect suggests that the denominator must be a multiple of 4. (either 4 or 8).

The number of tested questions in the first quarter is 8.

Quarter 2 – 43% incorrect suggests that the denominator must be a multiple of 7. The number of tested questions in the second quarter is 7.

Quarter 3 – 29% incorrect suggests that the denominator must be a multiple of 7. The number of tested question in the third quarter is 7.

Quarter 4 – 12% incorrect suggests that the denominator must be a multiple of 8. The number of tested question in the fourth quarter is 8.

 

So, here is the breakup –
[table]
[tbody]
[tr]
[th]Quarter[/th]
[th]Experimental Questions[/th]
[th]Tested Questions[/th]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 1[/td]
[td]2[/td]
[td]8[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 2[/td]
[td]3[/td]
[td]7[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 3[/td]
[td]3[/td]
[td]7[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 4[/td]
[td]3[/td]
[td]8[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table]

 

 

Quantitative Section

 

 

We know that the Verbal section has 41 questions. The Verbal Section is divided into four quarters.

We can safely assume the distribution of questions in each section as –

[table]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 1[/td]
[td]9[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 2[/td]
[td]9[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 3[/td]
[td]9[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 4[/td]
[td]10[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table]

 

Let us look at a sample report –

Quantitative Section GMAT CrackVerbal Enhanced Score Report
14%, 29%, 43% incorrect – all these percentages suggest that the denominator must be 7. i.e. the number of tested questions in each quarter of the quantitative section must be 7.

 

So, here is the breakup –
[table]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]Quarter[/td]
[td]Experimental Questions[/td]
[td]Tested Questions[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 1[/td]
[td]2[/td]
[td]7[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 2[/td]
[td]2[/td]
[td]7[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 3[/td]
[td]2[/td]
[td]7[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]Quarter 4[/td]
[td]3[/td]
[td]7[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table]

 

Change 2 – Level of Difficulty

Let us look at a sample report –

Level of Difficulty CrackVerbal Enhanced Score Report GMAT
We can see from this report that she has got questions that are easier incorrect. This clearly hurts your overall performance.

Change 3 – Time Management Section

Understanding time spent in each quarter helps determine whether you have issues with time management.

Also, this section gives you an idea about the average time spent on questions answered correctly vs. questions not answered correctly.

Let us look at a sample report –

Time Management GMAT Enhanced Score Report CrackVerbal

We can clearly that she has spent too much time in the second and third quarters of the Section and rushed through the last section.

Since, she rushed through the last section, she has got many questions in the last quarter incorrect.

Time Management GMAT Enhanced Score Report Crackverbal
This has adversely impacted her GMAT score. If the distribution of incorrect questions had been more uniform, she would have score higher.

Since, the incorrect questions are concentrated in one particular section, her score is much lower than what she should have scored.

CrackVerbal recommends this timing strategy –

For Verbal
[table]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]15 min[/td]
[td]8 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]30 min[/td]
[td]16 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]45 min[/td]
[td]24 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]60 min[/td]
[td]32 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]75 min[/td]
[td]41 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table]

 

For Quant
[table]
[tbody]
[tr]
[td]15 min[/td]
[td]8 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]30 min[/td]
[td]16 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]45 min[/td]
[td]23 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]60 min[/td]
[td]30 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[tr]
[td]75 min[/td]
[td]37 questions complete[/td]
[/tr]
[/tbody]
[/table]

 

Adios!!

I hope this article helped you in understanding the chnages in Enhanced Score Report and how to get around them to reach an amazing score.

If you loved the blog, please let us know in the comments!

Pro Tip: Curious about how to start off your own journey towards an awe-inspiring GMAT score ? Try out our free GMAT Online Trial course.

 

  • March, 2nd, 2017
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Has Verbal Become Tougher and Quant Become Easier on the GMAT?

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Firstly, let us define what we mean by “tougher” or “easier”. For the sake of simplicity, let us consider a particular test of 100 marks. Previously, 80% of the students scored above 50 marks but now only 70% of the students score above 50 marks. Would you say the test is now tougher?

 

How does this compare with the GMAT, you might ask? 🙂

 

Well, here is what someone who took the GMAT in August 2011 could have seen on his screen

 

GMAT Score: 730 (96th%ile)

 

Quant: 50 (92nd %ile)

 

Verbal: 38 (83rd %ile)

 

Here is what someone taking the GMAT in August 2013 (i.e. now) sees on his score report:

 

GMAT Score: 730 (96th %ile)

 

Quant: 50 (89th %ile)

 

Verbal: 38 (84th %ile)

 

So, what do you think has happened here? The Quant percentiles are going down and Verbal percentiles are going up i.e. for the same raw score you would have got a higher percentile in 2011 than in 2013.

 

Let us look at the published data from www.mba.com on the percentile charts.

 

In 2011, this is how the percentile charts looked:

 

CHART 1

 

Today if you go here, this is how the percentile charts look:

 

CHART 2

 

What does this mean?

 

This means that TECHNICALLY speaking, more people are scoring higher in Quant than a few years ago, and fewer people are scoring as high in Verbal now than a few years ago.

 

Please note that these percentiles have been calculated for the student population across the last 3 years. With over 750,000 people taking it worldwide during this period, it is statistically difficult for this data to be corrupted by any single phenomenon.

 

Why did this happen?

 

There are 3 reasons why this can happen:

 

1) The GMAT is getting tougher in Verbal and easier in Quant. So you have relatively easier questions giving you a higher score in Verbal while the opposite is happening in Quant.

 

However, this is NOT true. GMAC clearly says that it is as difficult for you to score a 51 in Quant as it was 5 years ago. The correspondence between “what it takes” and the “raw scores” has not really changed. Remember that only the percentiles have changed for the corresponding scores. So this reason is ruled out.

 

2) Test-takers are getting better at Verbal than at Quant thanks to the plethora of available material on the Internet and/or the techniques taught by GMAT prep companies are getting better.

 

Again, this looks tempting, but if you look at it closely then there is no major change in the approach to questions – I mean let us not kid ourselves. There are no magic solution to scoring a 760. There never was – there never will be 🙂

 

3)More test-takers are coming from a strong Quant background and a relatively weaker Verbal background.

 

However, improbable this might seem – this is the reason! With more people taking the GMAT from India, China and Asian countries the average Quant scores are going up and Verbal scores are going down.

 

Here is the table from the GMAC Geographic Trend Report for 2012. Note that TY means “Testing Year” – more like “Calendar Year”.

 

CHART 3

 

Source:

 

http://www.gmac.com/~/media/Files/gmac/Research/Geographic%20Trends/gmac-ty2012-world-trend-3.pdf

 

You can see that East & Southeast Asia have shown a sharp increase from around 40,000 test-takers to almost 78,000 test-takers, while US has gone down from 126,000 to 117,000 test-takers. Enough to statistically skew the averages.

 

Well! That was MY interpretation.

 

Now you can choose the order in which you want to take up the sections before starting the test. This is a recent change to the GMAT test structure. It was introduced in July 2017. This might cause more and more test takers to perform better on the Verbal section. I have done a detailed analysis of what this means to an Indian GMAT test-taker in the this blog

GMAT Section Selection – Everything you need to know

 

I would like to know your thoughts and am happy to interact with you in the comments section below 🙂

What do you think? Leave your comments in the comments section below!

Head over to our E-book library for useful information on how to achieve an awesome GMAT score!

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  • September, 4th, 2013
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5 Things You Should Know Before Taking Any GMAT Practice Tests

Reading Time: 7 minutes

I have spent over a decade in the test prep space in India – starting with CAT before going to the “dark side,” i.e. GMAT, in 2005. I want to give the readers the background about the birth of a species called MCT (patience please – the full-form is coming up).

 
Many years ago a relatively new entrant in the Indian CAT test prep space came up with a very innovative strategy to market. They created a “Mock CAT” series that started very early – around June or so.
 
One had to take a “Mock” CAT every Sunday to assess where one stood in relation to thousands of other test-takers. What’s more, the product was priced very aggressively – just around a few hundred rupees.
 
This opened up a new market for them – students who had enrolled elsewhere took this test series as an add-on. The low price point helped. Over the next few years in a show of one-upmanship, the rest of the CAT test-prep players jumped into the battlefield by trying to outdo each other with the number of “Mocks” they offered. This gave birth to the new segment of test-takers i.e. the hungry “Mock CAT” Taker (MCT).
 

The MCT, after a few failed attempts at CAT, reared its head towards the GMAT. This is when the need for mock GMAT came. In fact, the word ‘mock’ test, is a very Indian term – in the West, it is called a ‘practice’ test. Sorry, I digress.

 
 

Here are 5 things you should know about GMAT Practice Tests:

 
 

1. GMAT practice tests are like a thermometerGMAT is Like a Thermometer

 

If you were unwell you would use a thermometer to measure how you are doing. But the thermometer cannot be a cure by itself. So is the case with the GMAT practice tests – it can tell you where you stand in terms of your prep. But it cannot make you better on the test.

 

The mistake that test takers make is that they tend to take too many practice tests and too often. My suggestion is you take one to begin your preparation so that you have an idea of what to expect. Take another 3 over the next 6-8 weeks of your prep. Towards the end you should take a maximum of 1 test per week.

 

Remember, your brain cannot “learn” while you take the test. So you are not going to get better at solving parallelism questions in sentence correction by taking more tests. You can get better only if you study in depth i.e. learn the concept and practice questions based on it. As I said earlier, don’t think the thermometer can cure you J

 
 

2. Learn to SIMULATE the Test DaySimulate the GMAT Exam

 

Taking practice tests too lightly is the worst thing you can do. Remember, the GMAT is a 4-hour marathon and part of the exercise is also to prepare you for the rigors of the real test. So here are some dos and don’ts you can stick on the desk while you take the test.

 

cool-green-tickDos:

 

1. Take the test with the AWA and IR sections. This is to help you understand that your brain would already be mildly fatigued by the time you hit the Quant section.
 
2. Take the test at the same time you have booked your test slot (or plan to book it). This way you are able to understand your circadian cycle a lot better.
 
3. Eat and drink whatever you would during the breaks. This is to ensure that you understand how your body responds to the surge of carbohydrates.
 
 

crossDon’ts:

 
1. Take extra long breaks. On the real test you will get around 8 minutes; so stick to that. Use a small alarm or a watch to help you do this.
 
2. Eat or drink anything during the test. A nice mug of steaming coffee can surely help you while you practice, but remember that on the real test day you will have none of this. The same rule applies for cigarette breaks as well.
 
3. Check your mobile phone or emails during the test. On the real test day, you will have it switched off in a locker – try to do the same here.
 

You can book a slot to take practice tests at CrackVerbal’s test simulation lab at our Infantry Road center. You will also be given a GMAT scratch pad to work on – this is as close as it gets to the real GMAT experience!

 
 

3. Learn to STIMULATE your brainsStimulate Your Brain

 

A lot about GMAT is how you strategize. A good timing strategy, for example, can be the difference between a 600 and a 700. With so much at stake, you should get your test reactions down to a science.
 
So you know exactly how to pace yourself, when to give that extra 30 seconds to a question, and when to guess and move on. This is something we train our students to do, throughout the duration of our course.

 

Here are 3 absolute must-dos for any test you take:

 
1. Keep an error log that tells you WHY you made the mistake and not WHAT mistakes you made. The difference is crucial because it helps you not repeat it. As you are going through the questions you got wrong, ask yourself “Can I solve it now?”.
 
2. Analyze the hell out of the test from a behavior point of view. Ask yourself – why did you make that silly error, go over the scratch pad to see what was going on in your brain when you were solving the question, why you did not guess when you know you should have, why didn’t you use back-solving for that tough quant problem – you get the drift?
 
3. If you found a specific area uncomfortable on the test, go back to practicing more questions from that area. Maybe you want to ask for help – if you are a CrackVerbal student our faculty is just a phone-call/email away! 🙂
 
 

4. It is all in the mind – and we are not talking Karate here!It's All in the Mind

 

Anyone preparing seriously for the GMAT can tell you that it is as tough a mental game as it can get! We are almost reminded about sports – how players who have great ability perform poorly when they are not in form (leading to the cliché “Form is temporary, Class is permanent”).

 

Taking a test and scoring low can be devastating to the morale. So it is important that you know how to keep your focus and keep chipping away at the prep. Let us take a step back and try to see the goal of taking such practice tests.

 

You are taking the test to:

 

(a) Build your mental stamina

 

(b) Strategize on timing

 

(c) Do a SWOT (strength, weakness, opportunities and threats) analysis for your prep

 

(d) indicate your final GMAT score

 

Yes – the last one is struck out for a reason. I know students who have not scored above 650 on the practice tests getting a 700! On the other hand, there have been students who have consistently scored 750 on the practice but because they were not able to hold their nerve – ended up with a sub-700 on the real test.

 

Just like cricket, the GMAT is a game of glorious uncertainties and you never know the result till the last ball is bowled!

 

5. Keep it Official!Larry Rudner of the GMAC

 

Do you know the GMAT spends close to $2000 to create a single question? No test prep company can come close to it! What’s more – the GMAT algorithm is a closely guarded secret.
 
When I was talking to Dr. Larry Rudner, the chief psychometrician of the GMAT, I was surprised to know that even what we know of the test now, such as the number of experimental questions used, could be wrong.

 

So what happens is that apart from the GMAT prep tests, none of the other practice tests available come close to simulating the algorithm and question elegance of the real GMAT test. So when you take a test and end up with a random score, you get either dejected or elated. Both are wrong reactions.

 

Now you can choose the order in which you want to take up the sections before starting the test. This is a recent change to the GMAT test structure. It was introduced in July 2017. We have done a detailed analysis of what this means to an Indian GMAT test-taker in the this blog

GMAT Section Selection – Everything you need to know

 
The GMATPrep and ExamPack update (official tests available on mba.com) is scheduled for 31st July and our existing licenses will be valid. The update will not contain content updates. It will just be a UI overhaul with the new selection style offered.

 
Another issue I have observed in test-takers is not taking the GMAT prep tests till the very end because they want to save the best for the last. The problem with this approach is that you end up wasting thousands of awesome GMAT questions that best reflect the test – I would even say, better than the OG.
 
So once you have taken the GMAT prep test enough times, make sure you are able to solve as many GMAT prep questions on online forums. CrackVerbal students get a personal copy of this composite Question Bank that contains close to 2000 questions!
 
So if you are one – no need to worry, just stick to the study plan we have made for you!
 
 
Hope these techniques make a positive difference to your GMAT prep! If you’d like to share what works for you and what doesn’t, please leave a comment in the comment section below.
 
Head over to our Video library for more useful information on how to achieve an awesome GMAT score!
 
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  • June, 27th, 2013
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GMAT vs. GRE: Which is better?

GMAT-gre
Reading Time: 2 minutes

Well, to quickly answer that one – neither is “better” than the other! 🙂
Comparing the relative merits of these two competitive tests is impossible since there is really no concordance between them. The various factors that impact the percentile scores of these tests are so different that it’s impossible to make an ‘Apples to Apples’ comparison!

 

Some of these factors are:


 
Question types tested
 
Difficulty level of questions
 
Adaptive algorithm used
 
Scoring pattern
 
The test-taking population
 

You will have to answer the following 2 questions to answer the GMAT versus GRE question:


 
 

1Why do you need the scores?

 

If you are applying to an MBA program, then the GMAT is the gold standard. Some B-schools do accept GRE scores, but less than 5% of B-school applicants apply with their GRE scores. So it is that much harder for the AdComs to compare you with the vast majority who have a nice solid GMAT score.

 

If you keep it flexible and apply to both MBA as well as Masters programs, then the GRE is perhaps a better bet. It is more widely accepted for specialization and non-business courses; so you can save costs while keeping your options open.

 
 

2What is your preparation style?

 

All things being equal, you want to apply with higher test scores, which, in turn, are determined by your comfort level with the question types tested.

 
If you can hack your way through vocabulary and are not confident of your quant skills, then GRE might be the way to go. Even after the changes in August 2011, the test predominantly tests you on your ability to use the right words in context in Verbal.
 
The Quant portion is also easy if you are comfortable with the basics and can apply yourself to cracking advanced questions.
 
If you feel logic is your forte and loathe wordlists, then GMAT might be your cup of poison… er, I mean tea 🙂 Yes, even the dreaded Sentence Correction section can be cracked if you have decent English skills and can apply logic (another myth busted!) However remember that the preparation can stretch to a few months.
 
So what is the bottom line?
 
Keep your end objective and your strengths/weaknesses in mind, and then take your pick!
 
 
Hope these techniques make a positive difference to your GMAT prep! If you’d like to share what works for you and what doesn’t, please leave a comment in the comment section below.
 
Head over to our E-book library for more useful information on how to achieve an awesome GMAT score!
 
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